Uncategorized

The patient: the beginning of it all

by Elena Rocca, Better Evidence for Better Healthcare Manifesto

We often think of the perfect medical research and health care system as a system that puts patient’s care as the final aim of a long process. In a way, this is hardly controversial: patient’s interest must be prioritized over commercial interest, for instance. Research hypotheses, funding, experimental designs ought to be developed with a special consideration that they are meant to be primarily useful for the patient. Important steps are being taken in this direction. (more…)

Evidence synthesis in pharmacology

By Elena Rocca

Pharmacology is a complex science that aims to balance harm and benefit of treatments for the individual patient. How should different types of evidence be synthesised in order to optimize this task? Should evidence from randomized trials be prioritized over other evidence, following the EBM model? If not, how can different types of evidence be amalgamated in an alternative way? (more…)

Ethics of Reduction

Karin Engebretsen, Thinking about guidelines:

The question that is still with me after the workshop is how the naturalist paradigm might affect the “political correct” attitude towards patients suffering from medically unexplained syndromes.

If the political decision makers within the medical field believe in the biomedical model as the provider of the best medical practice, their “worldview” will automatically, influence the complete medical system.

The biomedical model excludes psychological and social factors and includes only biological factors in an attempt to understand a person’s medical illness or disorder. Thus, the biomedical model have a limited, reductionist attitude that divide the human body into separate elements focusing on biological factors. Patients often seem to have a unique expression of their symptoms and a unique combination of biological, social and psychological overlapping symptoms. So how do reductionism and dualism affect clinical guidelines and diagnosing related to medically unexplained syndromes?

I see this question as related to ethical issues in medical practice and I hope there will be more focus on this fact as a critical mechanism.

How Decisions are Made

Elena Rocca, Thinking about guidelines:

I was interested in a question that Sietse threw at us many times: what should be the purpose of a guideline? What does “helping to make a good decision” mean?

We got some inputs about it throughout the whole day: it might mean including the patient view, or reporting only the evidence with no recommendation, or giving recommendation but being transparent about which evidence was considered and how it was judged, or again, as Sietse suggested, it might mean to explain what is “to make an inference”, what happens when a clinical decision is made. I was particularly interested in this last suggestion, and I felt it remained a bit “in the air”. Does it mean that we would need a guideline about the decision process? About the implicit and sometimes unaware stand that the clinician takes by valuing one or the other evidence, following the guideline versus personal judgement?

The Person-Centred Care of Medically Unexplained Symptoms – a revolution is afoot

Another great summary of one of our events by @osteofm! So glad she could attend and give such a fab review 🙂 (pssst check out her blog, there are other great posts there)

osteofm

A one day symposium, at St George’s, University of London, 28 September 2016. 

A collaboration between the European Society for Person Centered Healthcare, and the CauseHealth Project.

OK.  Take a deep breath.  I just did.  Because on opening my notebook to begin trying to make sense of this amazing one-day Symposium in London, I have discovered that I took 32 pages of notes.  And I didn’t even get everything down.  Yes it was packed with intellectual stimulation,  organized by the exciting CauseHealth people, in collaboration with the ESPCH, who are all very brainy and who are exploring a field so fascinating, far-reaching and multi-layered that it’s not easy to even define.  There was politics, philosophy, taxonomy, research, education, neurology, psychology, croissants.  What’s not to like?  So prepare yourself.  As blogs go, this is a long one.

Andrew Miles– (please forgive the absence of titles and letters for…

View original post 3,338 more words

CauseHealth events in Nottingham and Madrid

It is an exciting spring for the CauseHealth project. In January, we organised the N=1 workshop here at NMBU. And in May and June our partner institutions will host a conference in Nottingham and a one-day symposium in Madrid. (more…)

You’re History (Hasta la Vista, baby)

By Neil Maltby — author of the becomingmorehuman blog, a physiotherapist in the UK, and a CauseHealth collaborator

She seemed straight forward enough on assessment. 45yrs old. Sudden pain onset from a seemingly innocuous movement many years ago. Episodic but progressive back pain since. Almost full range of movement. No significant neurological, inflammatory, vascular or other suspicious signs. One thing did sit in my mind though. It was as I asked her to reach down to the floor. (more…)