A philosophical conundrum at the heart of the cranial debate: as explained by Professor Stephen Tyreman

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A reminder of the great mind and gentle humanity of Stephen Tyreman.  I was honoured to be sent this to publish on the blog, and hope that through writings such as this, he can continue to enlighten and inform us.  He wrote it in response to a piece by Monica Noy on “cognitive dissonance”.


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Cranial Concept, Reality and Perception

Thanks Monica for this honest and thought-provoking piece and also to Penny for drawing my attention to Monica’s thoughts.  It takes a lot of courage to speak out against the prevailing assumptions, practices and mores of any group and particularly of osteopathy which continues to be defensive and therefore somewhat ‘touchy’ about its identity and status in respect to other parts of healthcare.

I suppose I’m a bit closer to Penny’s view on the cranial concept, which is that while the theoretical ‘foundation’ of cranial work is very suspect with…

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In memory of Stephen Tyreman

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by Rani Lill Anjum

This week on the evening of 19 November 2018, we lost our dear friend and colleague, Stephen Tyreman. Stephen was involved in the CauseHealth project since the very beginning and will be missed deeply. In the spring, we will organise a final CauseHealth event in his memory. (more…)

A personal reflection on person-centred care and the role of stories in healthcare

 

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by Stephen Tyreman

This is an extract from a recent article written by Stephen Tyreman for the International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine. The full text can be found here.

Understanding what person-centred means is much more complex and multi-factorial than I once assumed. It is not merely a question of considering a person’s individual needs and concerns and putting them first. It is recognising that human beings face up to the challenge of illness, pain and disability differently from how we might understand and seek to correct a fault in a car, say. (more…)

CAUSAL DISPOSITIONS IN RISK ANALYSIS

Capture 3Technology should make our life better, easier and safer. And yet, medicines, pesticides, nanotechnologies, biotechnologies et cetera, may represent a potential threat to health and environment. Some of the new technologies might be safe for most, but they could still be harmful for vulnerable individuals, communities or ecosystems. (more…)

Managing Complexity In Musculoskeletal Conditions: Reflections From A Physiotherapist

In this blog (and linked article), physiotherapist Matt Low explains how he uses patient narratives, mind-maps and the vector model of causation to help his patients. The result is a person-centered approach that emphasises causal complexity, individual context and the idea that at least some of the causes of pain can be counteracted and thus controlled by the patient. Matt is a collaborator of CauseHealth and this is his second article describing his unique approach to chronic pain.

Perspectives on Physiotherapy

I was fortunate enough to have been invited by Physio First to contribute to their journal ‘In Touch’ and I chose to write about managing complexity with the different types of ‘evidence’ that we deal with in a healthcare setting.

This is an area of interest for me and I still grapple with many areas of clinical practice.  These include balancing the normative and narrative examination, evaluating and weighting the evidence appropriately for the person seeking care in front of me and also reconciling and communicating the reasoning process within a person centred framework.  Clearly, this is work in progress and I hope this reflective piece demonstrates a movement in this direction.

I hope this paper is informative and useful in that it shares some of my deliberations, thoughts and perspectives in clinical care.

Many thanks to Physio First http://www.physiofirst.org.uk/ for giving me the opportunity to share this.

Managing complexity…

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Living with complexity and big data. Causal dispositionalim enters pharmacovigilance

Ralph Edwards on dispositionalism in pharmacovigilance

We have seen a lot of interest in the CauseHealth approach and issues during these last years, especially among clinicians who see a need for a more person centered healthcare. Can this be useful also outside the clinic? Yes, according to senior medical advisor at the WHO Uppsala Monitoring Center for Drug Safety, Ralph Edwards. In a recent perspectives article in the UMC report, he argues that dispositionalism can be useful for dealing with complexity, individual variation and the patient’s unique context. (more…)