CauseHealth and the clinic. Philosophical bias in medicine

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Any science is built on assumptions that are non-empirical, and rarely debated.

A seminar at NMBU invited a group of clinicians from around Norway to discuss philosophical biases in medicine with us and each other. We discussed the challenge of pursuing genuine person centered healthcare for individual patient in a system of New Public Management, standardisation and silo medicine. The invited participants had backgrounds from psychology, nursing, general practice, psychiatry, physiotherapy, osteopathy, rehabilitation, speech language pathology, and more. (more…)

New CauseHealth resource in progress for healthcare professionals

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In the final year of CauseHealth, we have been working on a new book written specifically for clinicians and other healthcare professionals. The book is meant as a resource for those interested in the relationship between their daily practice and the philosophical assumptions that motivate this practice. (more…)

A philosophical conundrum at the heart of the cranial debate: as explained by Professor Stephen Tyreman

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A reminder of the great mind and gentle humanity of Stephen Tyreman.  I was honoured to be sent this to publish on the blog, and hope that through writings such as this, he can continue to enlighten and inform us.  He wrote it in response to a piece by Monica Noy on “cognitive dissonance”.


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Cranial Concept, Reality and Perception

Thanks Monica for this honest and thought-provoking piece and also to Penny for drawing my attention to Monica’s thoughts.  It takes a lot of courage to speak out against the prevailing assumptions, practices and mores of any group and particularly of osteopathy which continues to be defensive and therefore somewhat ‘touchy’ about its identity and status in respect to other parts of healthcare.

I suppose I’m a bit closer to Penny’s view on the cranial concept, which is that while the theoretical ‘foundation’ of cranial work is very suspect with…

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A personal reflection on person-centred care and the role of stories in healthcare

 

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by Stephen Tyreman

This is an extract from a recent article written by Stephen Tyreman for the International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine. The full text can be found here.

Understanding what person-centred means is much more complex and multi-factorial than I once assumed. It is not merely a question of considering a person’s individual needs and concerns and putting them first. It is recognising that human beings face up to the challenge of illness, pain and disability differently from how we might understand and seek to correct a fault in a car, say. (more…)